Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘genetic engineering’

A.W. Daniels may not have set out to be one of the 50 Great Writers You Should Be Reading, but it’s a goal he may just accomplish. awdanielsbooks

“Apparently, I’ve been able to strike a nerve with a certain type of reader,” says Daniels. “I can only hope it’s for the good.”

Apparently, it was for the good as Daniels is a finalist in The Authors Show (www.theauthorsshow.com) annual competition.

The author of The Bethlehem Project series – Genetically Privileged, Genetically Conflicted and the forthcoming Genetically Rejected – has always been interested in the natural sciences. An article about designer babies he read while on a business trip to Canada sparked his imagination.

“I began speculating about the possibilities, ethics and the product of such an endeavor,” Daniels says.

What would those individuals created from such technology think of the world that spawned them? Would they see their creators as inferiors? were only a few of the questions he contemplated regarding the subject of genetic engineering.

The idea for the series developed for almost a year before Daniels began putting words to paper. Once started, it took only a month to complete the first draft.

“It literally spewed onto the pages after I began writing,” Daniels says. “This means there was quite a bit of editing involved.”

Growing up in conventional middle-class America, Daniels feels technology has changed almost every facet of daily life, for better and otherwise. On that, Daniels states, “I’ve always felt that change must occur and it is up to the individual to use the new tools available to improve our personal and societal environment.”

The author’s reading tastes run the gamut from medical and science journals to Cervantes, Machiavelli and Stephen Colbert to a dash of science fiction from Kurt Vonnegut.

His eclectic reading choices reflect his desire to encourage non-conventional thought. “I strive for my children to explore any topic, be it religion, politics or any facet of society and question the status quo,” Daniels explains. “I want them to ask themselves ‘what can I do to make it better?’ I’ve seen conventional thought quell the inquiring mind in school and everyday life.”

In an interview on The Authors Show, Daniels was asked about the Biblical references of his book Genetically Privileged.

While not attempting to create a religious book, Daniels says, “Religion and science have always struggled.” By using names and situations, “I wanted that thread running through the series. It’s indicative of the struggle between science and religion, how they grow apart then come back together in certain situations. I believe in the end we’re going to find that religion and science are more closely related than we think currently.”

The science of the book goes beyond cloning. Most of the science in the book may sound realistic but Daniels assures he was making up a good deal of it. “There is legislation against some of the aspects of this book in most of the industrialized nations,” he states in the same interview.

Given the opportunity, Daniels would love to speak with Dostoyevsky on nihilism, Dante on theology, Twain on politics and life (which would make a very interesting conversation) and Steinbeck on society. “Each would have such insight into the segment of life for which they are known.”

It would also make fascinating dinner conversation.

For more information, including purchasing Genetically Privileged and Genetically Conflicted, visit www.awdaniels.net

Pen has self-published 20 titles in print and e-book formats. Her latest endeavor, Nero’s Fiddle, is a fictitious account of an EMP attack on the United States with women heroes. Visit Nero’s Fiddle website at http://bit.ly/1yYsNH2 follow her on Twitter @penspen or visit her website at www.penspen.info 

Read Full Post »

Author: A.W. Daniels

Paperback: 246 pages

Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing (July 30, 2013)

ISBN-10: 1491231084

Kindle: ASIN: B00EGDWB86

If you could choose your child’s eye color, hair color, physical, mental and intellectual disposition, would you?

What if someone else chose all that for you?

This is exactly what happens in A.W. Daniels’ Genetically Privileged.

Joe and Mary Christiansen tried to have their own child. Due to complications during the pregnancy that would endanger the lives of both mother and child, that child had to be aborted. The remains of that abortion are confiscated by Dr. Gabriel.

A little later down the road, Joe and Mary visit the fertility clinic where Dr. Gabriel works. It turns out that Dr. Gabriel is a good friend of Joe Christiansen. With invitro fertilization Dr. Gabriel succeeds in helping his friends have a healthy baby boy.

The questions begin when their son, Justice Christiansen begins showing remarkable aptitude at a very young age. Like saying his first word at five months old.

Genetic engineering is a much-debated topic, as it should be. DNA is a frightening and heavily responsible technology that should not be taken lightly.

But Dr. Gabriel is not a madman. He seems to be sincere in his desire and effort to end suffering in the human race through genetic engineering. It’s the other people involved who wish to take it to another level the reader needs to worry about. privileged

That’s where I will leave the synopsis, not wanting to give away too much of the fascinating story line.

Daniels deftly explains the scientific aspect of genetic engineering without getting the reader too bogged down in technical terminology. The author weaves a tapestry among the characters whose lives are entwined long before Joe and Mary move to the little town of Bethlehem.

It is a fresh approach to the subject of genetic engineering where the engineering is already occurring with plans for expansion. The changes are noticeable and, at times, a little dangerous.

It’s one of those books that leaves you thinking about the ramifications of the process. And what might happen should someone take it upon themselves to implement the engineering without it being public knowledge.

Genetically Privileged is a good read, especially for those with particular interest in the process of genetic engineering.

Pen has self-published 20 titles in print and e-book formats. Her latest endeavor, Nero’s Fiddle, is a fictitious account of an EMP attack on the United States with women heroes. Visit Nero’s Fiddle website at http://bit.ly/1yYsNH2 follow her on Twitter @penspen or visit her website at www.penspen.info Contact her at mytuppenceblog at yahoo.com to inquire about proofreading, editing and formatting services.

Read Full Post »